Information on:

Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve

17000 Armstrong Woods Road
707-869-2015

The serene, majestic beauty of this Grove is a living reminder of the magnificent primeval redwood forest that covered much of this area before logging operations began during the 19th century. Armstrong Redwoods preserves stately and magnificent Sequoia sempervirens, commonly known as the coast redwood. These trees stand together as a testament to the wonders of the natural world. The grove offers solace from the hustle and bustle of daily life, offering the onlooker great inspiration and a place for quiet reflection.

The ancient coast redwood is the tallest living thing on our planet!  These remarkable trees live to be 500-1,000 years old, grow to a diameter of 12-16 feet, and stand from 200-250 feet tall. Some trees survive to over 2,000 years and tower above 350 feet. Coast redwoods are classified as temperate rainforests and they need wet and mild climates to survive. The rainfall in Armstrong Redwoods averages 55 inches per year and the trees are often shrouded in a mystical fog that helps to maintain the moist conditions needed for the redwoods to survive. To find out more about these magnificent trees click the link About Coast Redwoods to the right. 



Reviews

Adam Spivack

Rating:
Tuesday, May 29, 2018
Beautiful trails and scenery. If you are an avid hiker there are amazing trails that take you through the beautiful forests and onto some amazing meadows and vistas. If you want to walk around and not take a long hike then they have the huge redwoods and easy parking with paved surfaces. I did a 6 mile hike from pool ridge to edge loop and it was beautiful. The trails were not very crowded and excellently marked. A few spots are a little harder to figure out the signs but never spent more than 1 minute doing so. The park is really well taken care of and stunning. If you like hiking you should definitely do it.

Bill Tickner

Rating:
Friday, July 6, 2018
I hike Armstrong woods several times per week. Easily as impressive as Muir Woods and way less people. There's a hike for everyone...flat paved roads for peeps and pups. Flat trails for people only. Aggressive steep trails from redwood Grove to hilltop and back (without needing to backtrack). Bullfrog campground rests atop The ridge (scary one lane road but worth it). They keep several spots saved for on demand camping (really only available on Fridays if you come for a weekend). Behind bullfrog and technically past Armstrong property is Austin Creek State reserve which has several backpacking campsites. If you are adventurous go for it. Just know that the trails into the reserve go down into a canyon of sorts at the bottom of which is Austin Creek. In the summer it will be significantly warmer down there, much like the bottom of the grand canyon is warmer than the rim. All in all, these parks are well worth the effort to visit them!

Betty Blahna

Rating:
Wednesday, July 4, 2018
A peaceful wondrous setting. A bit smaller but much better than the crowded Muir woods. Redwoods that are 60 ft taller than those in Muir woods! One is as tall as a football field is long! Hiking trails. It's an awesome place. And right by the Russian River in Guerneville to round out a day by the river or wander this picturesque town in famed wine country. Make a day of it. Or better yet a weekend!

M Herbert

Rating:
Wednesday, June 6, 2018
This place was extremely cool to see. Prior to coming here, I googled redwood trees and was disappointed. But being here in person was just absolutely fantastic. I took about 121 pictures here if that tells you how cool it is. The greens are so vibrant, the shadows add depth, there are so many learning opportunities for local wildlife here. I would definitely recommend it to anyone. (I posted 90 photos to here if you wanna check them out!)

Arthur Diaz

Rating:
Monday, July 9, 2018
I walk here everyday to enjoy the natural beauty the redwoods have to offer. Evening and morning walking in this Grove is pure Bliss. The depth of trees among trees among trees points the shimmering sun through the arms at the height of the redwood forest.

Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve is not affiliated with AmericanTowns Media